Breastfeeding and Maternal Health Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 7 Issue 6

The breastfeeding bulletin has decided to expand its scope from breastfeeding to both breastfeeding and wider maternal health issues. Now alongside developments in infant feeding, we will also cover the emerging trends in both antenatal and postnatal care. We hope you enjoy it, and don’t forget to share it with your colleagues!

1st – 7th August was World Breastfeeding Week, 2016. Click here to see what news, research and events were tweeted for #WBW2016

Paracetamol in pregnancy “link to autism and ADHD” not proven.

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the headlines

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: 4th July, 2016.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A closer look behind recent headlines which suggested that women who take paracetamol during pregnancy risk having a child with ADHD or autism.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the original research paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

Safety of intrauterine devices in breastfeeding women: a systematic review.

Source: Contraception, 2016, article in press.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: July, 2016.

Publication type: Systematic review.

In a nutshell: This paper investigated the safety of levonorgestrel (LNG)-releasing and copper-bearing (Cu) intrauterine device (IUD) safety among breastfeeding women. Overall, risks for adverse events for IUD users were similar or lower for breastfeeding women versus non-breastfeeding women. No evidence was found to indicate the CU-IUD use in breastfeeding women influenced breastfeeding performance or infant growth.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

An integrated model of breastfeeding peer counselling support of feasible and associated with improved exclusive breastfeeding.

Source: Maternal and Child Health Journal, 2016, early view article.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: 16th July, 2016.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This article compared the feasibility and effectiveness of an integrated model of peer counselling breastfeeding support characterised by select home visits augmented with individual clinic visits and group education in comparison to the standard care model. The authors found that although peer counsellors could feasibly maintain breastfeeding outcomes with fewer home visits, group education classes did not appear to be beneficial in terms of improving breastfeeding outcomes.

Length of publication: 10 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

Pregnancy supplements “don’t help, just take vit D and folic acid”.

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the headlines

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: 12th July, 2016.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A closer look behind recent headlines which suggested that taking multivitamins in pregnancy is not necessary.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the original research paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

Telephone-administered interpersonal psychotherapy by nurse-midwives for postpartum depression.

Source: Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health, 2016, 61 (4), p. 456-466.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: July/August, 2016.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This prospective cohort study sought to test the feasibility, effectiveness and acceptability of certified nurse-midwife telephone-administered interpersonal psychotherapy (CNM-IPT) as a treatment for postpartum depression (PPD). It was found that CNM-IPT was effective and acceptable as an approach to reducing the severity of PPD.

Length of publication: 11 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

Breastfeeding and opiate substitution therapy: starting to understand infant feeding choices.

Source: Substance Abuse: Research and Treatment, 2016, 10 (Suppl 1), p. 43-47.

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: July, 2016.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study sought to better understand and support this infant feeding choices and breastfeeding experiences of women on opioid substitution therapy.

Length of publication: 5 pages.