Breastfeeding & Maternal Health Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 6 Issue 4

The breastfeeding bulletin has decided to expand its scope from breastfeeding to both breastfeeding and wider maternal health issues. Now alongside developments in infant feeding, we will also cover the emerging trends in both antenatal and postnatal care. We hope you enjoy it, and don’t forget to share it with your colleagues!

Nurses’ current breastfeeding knowledge: an evidenced-based change project

Source:Clinical Scholars Review, 2014, 7 (1), p. 42-47.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: April, 2014.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: The aim of this project was to compare postpartum nurses’ current breastfeeding knowledge and the immediate effects of a training session covering 3 common clinical practices that are considered barriers to exclusive breastfeeding (i.e. separation of mother and newborn, formula supplementation, and the use of pacifiers breastfeeding newborns).

Length of publication: 6 pages.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the original paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Pharmacists as an underutilized resource for improving community-level support of breastfeeding

Source:Journal of Human Lactation, 2014, 30 (1), p. 14-19.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: February, 2014.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: This article gives an overview of the important role community pharmacists can play in providing community-level support for breastfeeding, including providing health promotion advice and support.

Length of publication: 6 pages.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the original paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Clinical care for opioid-using pregnant and postpartum women: the role of obstetric providers

Source:American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2014, 210 (4), p. 302-310.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: April, 20140.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: This articles reviews clinical care issues related to illicit and therapeutic opioid use among women in pregnancy and in the postpartum period, outlining the major responsibilities of those caring for these patients during the antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum periods.

Length of publication: 9 pages.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the original paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Empty Arms: Supporting bereaved mothers during the immediate postnatal period

Source:British Journal of Midwifery, 2014, 22 (4), p. 246-252.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: April, 2014.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: This article outlines the emotional support and physical care required by mothers who experience the loss of a baby, providing midwives with an understanding of grief theory and the grieving process to enable them to care for the bereaved mother.

Length of publication: 7 pages.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the original paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Interventions for nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy

Source:The Cochrane Library, 2014, Issue 3.

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: 21st March, 2014.

Publication type: Review.

In a nutshell: This updated review examined a variety of treatments used to treat nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy. However, although some treatments were found to have benefits, there is a lack of high-quality evidence to back up any advice regarding which interventions to use.

Length of publication: 138 pages.

Depression during pregnancy may affect babies development

Source:British Journal of Midwifery, 2014, 22 (4), p. 294-295.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: April, 2014.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A recent study has suggested that children who are born to women who suffer depression during pregnancy are more likely to develop depressive illness themselves in later life.

Length of publication: 2 pages.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the original paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Night time breastfeeding behaviour is associated with more nocturnal sleep among first-time mothers at one month postpartum

Source:Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 2014, 10 (3), p.313-319.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: March, 2014.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study assessed the sleep duration and quality in the first month postpartum, comparing the sleep of women who exclusively breastfed at night to those who used formula. Whilst each group had similar sleep patterns in late pregnancy, there was a significant group difference in nocturnal sleep at one month postpartum with women who breastfed averaging 30 minutes more nocturnal sleep than women who used formula at night. The authors suggest that women should be encouraged to exclusively breastfeed as this may help promote postpartum recovery, but acknowledge that more research is required in this area.

Length of publication: 9 pages.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the original paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.